Are You at Risk?

Almost Half of Older Adults Experience Insomnia

Are you more likely to experience insomnia?

Almost half of older adults experience insomnia.

Contributing factors

The more items that apply to you, the more likely you may be to experience insomnia.

Feeling stressed

Including worrying about everyday issues and stressful events—such as work, money, or relationships

Being over age 60

Because it becomes harder to stay asleep as you get older

Taking certain medications

Some have ingredients that can keep you awake, including certain over-the-counter products and prescription medications

Making certain lifestyle choices

Including smoking, drinking alcohol or caffeine, and not being physically active

Having unhealthy sleep habits

Including sleeping in an uncomfortable environment (too warm, noisy or light), spending too much time in bed, napping too long, and going to bed and waking up at different times each day

Going against your circadian rhythms (internal clock)

When you try to sleep on a schedule that’s not natural for your body, like when you travel to another time zone or work the night shift

What May Be Causing Your Insomnia?

What may be causing your insomnia?

Understanding some of the causes of insomnia may hold the key to helping you sleep. With this simple quiz, test your knowledge and learn about what’s true and what’s false about insomnia!

Sleep Quiz 1 of 5

When you don’t have a set sleep schedule, it is easier for your body to fall and stay asleep.

Not exactly, but..

Keeping a consistent wake/sleep schedule is important. Doing so can play a crucial role in strengthening the natural rhythms of your wake and sleep cycles. This helps you get the sleep you need throughout the night.

Correct!

That’s FALSE. Keeping a consistent wake/sleep schedule is important. Doing so can play a crucial role in strengthening the natural rhythms of your wake and sleep cycles. This helps you get the sleep you need throughout the night.

Managing stress levels is all you need to do to get a better night’s sleep.

Not totally wrong

Although worrying about obligations such as finances, work, school, and your overall health can certainly keep you up at night, managing your stress alone may not be enough. Insomnia is a treatable condition. And when managing stress isn’t enough, there are medications available. Talk to your doctor if your insomnia is becoming a burden.

You’re right

Although worrying about obligations such as finances, work, school, and your overall health can certainly keep you up at night, managing your stress alone may not be enough. Insomnia is a treatable condition. And when managing stress isn’t enough, there are medications available. Talk to your doctor if your insomnia is becoming a burden.

Sleep hygiene is not always enough to get a full night's sleep.

‘A’ for effort

This is TRUE. Practicing good sleep hygiene—like avoiding caffeine in the evening, powering down electronics, and meditating before bed—play an important part in a successful treatment plan, but they’re not always enough. If you've tried making lifestyle changes and are still struggling with insomnia, it may be time to talk to your doctor about your options.

High five!

Practicing good sleep hygiene—like avoiding caffeine in the evening, powering down electronics, and meditating before bed—play an important part in a successful treatment plan, but they’re not always enough. If you've tried making lifestyle changes and are still struggling with insomnia, it may be time to talk to your doctor about your options.

As you age, it becomes harder to stay asleep.

We wish this wasn’t true

But unfortunately, it can be. Age may bring wisdom, but it may also come with difficulty staying asleep. There are many reasons why people aged 60+ are more likely to experience insomnia.

Unfortunately, this is true

You spotted the truth. Age may bring wisdom, but it may also come with difficulty staying asleep. There are many reasons why people aged 60+ are more likely to experience insomnia.

Brain activity may play a role in how you sleep.

Shucks, that’s true

Your brain activity helps to regulate your sleep. There are 2 main pathways in your brain that work together to regulate your wake and sleep. Each pathway has chemical messengers that send signals.

Under regular conditions, sleep occurs when the wake-promoting signals turn down and sleep-promoting signals ramp up and take over, allowing you to transition to sleep. Now you can see how both pathways may play a role in insomnia.

You’re heating up!

That’s TRUE. Your brain activity helps to regulate your sleep. There are 2 main pathways in your brain that work together to regulate your wake and sleep. Each pathway has chemical messengers that send signals.

Under regular conditions, sleep occurs when the wake-promoting signals turn down and sleep-promoting signals ramp up and take over, allowing you to transition to sleep. Now you can see how both pathways may play a role in insomnia.

Is it time you ask your health care professional about BELSOMRA?

If you’re having trouble falling or staying asleep and you’ve tried lifestyle changes with limited success—ask your doctor if BELSOMRA could be right for you.

Aid that conversation by downloading this helpful doctor discussion tool and bring it with you to your next appointment.

Free trial offer for BELSOMRA

See if you are eligible to receive a free 10-tablet trial offer of BELSOMRA.

Learn More
If You're Having Trouble Sleeping, Talk to Your Doctor About Lifestyle Changes or Medicine

If you’re having trouble sleeping, talk to your doctor about lifestyle changes or medicine.


Selected Risk Information

BELSOMRA may cause decreased awareness and alertness. The morning after you take BELSOMRA, your ability to drive safely and think clearly may be decreased. You may also have sleepiness during the day.

  • Do not take more BELSOMRA than prescribed.
  • Do not take BELSOMRA unless you are able to stay in bed a full night (at least 7 hours) before you must be active again.
  • Take BELSOMRA within 30 minutes of going to bed.

BELSOMRA may cause serious side effects, including:

  • worsening depression or suicidal thoughts and actions. Call your doctor right away if you have any worsening depression or thoughts of suicide or dying.
  • complex sleep behaviors, including sleep-walking, sleep-driving or other activities while not fully awake. Call your doctor right away if you experience a complex sleep behavior.
  • temporary inability to move or talk (sleep paralysis) for up to several minutes while you are going to sleep or waking up.
  • temporary weakness in your legs that can happen during the day or at night.

Do not take BELSOMRA if you fall asleep often at unexpected times (narcolepsy).

BELSOMRA is a controlled substance because it can be abused or cause dependence.

Before taking BELSOMRA, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have a history of depression, mental illness, or suicidal thoughts
  • have a history of drug or alcohol abuse or addiction
  • have a history of a sudden onset of muscle weakness (cataplexy)
  • have a history of falling asleep often at unexpected times (narcolepsy) or daytime sleepiness
  • have lung or breathing problems
  • have liver problems
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed

Medicines can interact with each other, sometimes causing serious side effects. Do not take BELSOMRA with other medicines that can make you sleepy unless your doctor tells you to.

Do not drink alcohol while taking BELSOMRA. It can increase your chances of getting serious side effects.

Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, do anything dangerous, or do other activities that require clear thinking after taking BELSOMRA.

You may still feel drowsy the next day after taking BELSOMRA. Do not drive or do other dangerous activities until you feel fully awake.

The most common side effect of BELSOMRA is sleepiness the next day after you take BELSOMRA.

How Should I Take BELSOMRA?

  • Take BELSOMRA exactly as your doctor tells you to take it.
  • Only take BELSOMRA 1 time each night, if needed, within 30 minutes of going to bed.
  • Only take BELSOMRA when you can get a full night’s sleep (at least 7 hours).
  • Do not take BELSOMRA if you drank alcohol that evening or before bed.
  • BELSOMRA may be taken with or without a meal. However, BELSOMRA may take longer to work if you take it with or right after meals.
  • Call your doctor if your insomnia (sleep problem) worsens or is not better within 7 to 10 days. This may mean that there is another condition causing your sleep problem.
  • If you take too much BELSOMRA, call your doctor right away or get emergency treatment.

Please read the accompanying Medication Guide for BELSOMRA and discuss it with your doctor. The physician Prescribing Information also is available.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.